Should Hull City be allowed to change their name to Hull City Tigers?

The What's The Story? panel have their say...

Last Updated: 16/04/14 3:35pm

Santa Claus changed his robes and Cassius Clay changed his name - so why can't Hull City call themselves Hull City Tigers?

As the What's the Story? panel debated Hull's desire to tag Tigers onto the end of their name, Johnny Nelson argued that change - whether it affects a football club, a heavyweight world champion or legend from folklore - is inevitable and people ultimately move on.

The Independent's Patrick Barclay said the FA had made a good decision in turning down Hull's bid to become the Hull City Tigers.

"If the question had been: 'Do you want to change your name to Hull Tigers or do you want to back to the fourth division?' then I think people would have looked at it in a different way."

Paddy Barclay

But Nelson concluded, why shouldn't they change their name if it makes commercial sense?

"You look back in history and whenever anybody has tried to do anything like that there has been uproar at the time but eventually, in the long run, people get it," said the Ringside presenter.

"Father Christmas used to be dressed in green and then Coca Cola got involved and now he is dressed in red, while Muhammad Ali used to be Cassius Marcelas Clay. We forget about these little things.

"It is a silly argument, although I can understand the business side of it and the passion of the fans. But I don't think that it will make any difference to them buying a ticket and watching them every week.

"The Hull owner [Assem Allam] is putting his own money into the club and he is thinking that commercially for the best interests of the club he can generate more money so they can get more players and get more success if they change the name.

"He has made so much money because he is a businessman. No disrespect to the fans but they are obviously not as business savvy as he is, otherwise they would own the club."

Marketing

Although journalist Barclay said in this case the FA had made the right call, he would have been tempted to back the change had he been a Hull fan and had he been convinced by the commercial argument.

"The FA have really made a good decision, I think," he said. "There's nothing wrong with changing your name. It depends on the case. The 110 years of history is what persuades people.

"If I had been a Hull fan - and I can't really say it because I am not - I think I would have voted for Hull Tigers because Allam is not going to be around forever and he thinks that the marketing in the Far East, a very important market, is going to make a difference.

"If the question had been: 'Do you want to change your name to Hull Tigers or do you want to back to the fourth division?' then I think people would have looked at it in a different way."

Fellow guest Jamie Peacock pointed out that the relatively smooth transition to new club names in rugby league was aided by the revolution of the sport as a whole with the dawn of Super League.

"The whole sport changed at once," he said. "If a club is trying to change on its own, that is where the aggravation comes."