Germany's Thomas Bach elected new President of International Olympic Committee

Last Updated: 10/09/13 11:14pm

  • Share:

The International Olympic Committee has a new President and Thomas Bach has promised to offer stability and consistency in the role.

German Thomas Bach has been elected as the new President of the International Olympic Committee.

Bach, who was favourite to win the vote in Buenos Aires, replaces Jacques Rogge, who has stepped down after 12 years in the role.

There were six candidates - Bach, who was Germany's national Olympic committee chief, Singapore's Ng Ser Miang, Wu Ching-Kuo of Taiwan, Richard Carrion of Puerto Rico, Ukrainian pole vault legend Sergey Bubka and Swiss lawyer Denis Oswald.

"I will put into practise what my motto was during the campaign: 'unity in diversity'."
Thomas Bach

Boxing chief Wu was eliminated after the first round of voting in Buenos Aires, tying for last place with Ng, but polling fewer votes than his Singapore colleague in the run-off.

It went to a second round with 94 IOC members eligible to vote and this time Bach - who becomes the first Olympic champion to win the presidency - emerged with an absolute majority.

Bach polled 49 of the available 93 votes, beating Puerto Rican Richard Carrion into second place on 29 votes. The votes fell off after that with Ng getting six, Oswald five and Bubka four.

The campaign occasionally lacked Olympic spirit. Bach faced allegations that he cheated in his fencing career by using water on his gloves to disable the electric monitoring system. He won gold for West Germany in the 1976 Games in Montreal.

Bach, a lawyer by profession, is the ultimate insider having been a member since 1991 and has been vice-president three times while also heading up the Judicial Commission.

The German, 59, becomes only the ninth president in the body's 119-year history. Bach will have an initial eight-year term, with the possibility of another four years after that.

His election means there has only ever been one non-European as IOC President, the controversial American Avery Brundage, who ran the organisation from 1952-72.

Bach said: "I know what the enormous responsibilites are of being IOC President but I am very happy. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

"You my friends and colleagues have placed in me an overwhelming sign of trust. I also have enormous respect for my fellow candidates and I will work with you.

"I will put into practise what my motto was during the campaign: 'unity in diversity'."

German chancellor Angela Merkel led the tributes: "I warmly congratulate you on your election as IOC president. Being chosen for this politically important office shows impressively how much trust you enjoy within the Olympic family.

"I am very pleased that Germany will be represented by you further at international level."

  • Share:

Most Popular

Features

Richest contracts

Richest contracts

Baseball is handing out the richest contract ever but how have other Stateside sports rewarded their stars?

Halsall targeting Rio

Halsall targeting Rio

Fran Halsall believes her gold-medal winning exploits in Glasgow will guide her to future success.

World Series preview

World Series preview

Who has the edge going into the World Series? Alex Ferguson assesses the Royals and Giants' chances.