Bernstein - No Blatter mandate

FA chairman reiterates call for Fifa election to be postponed

Bernstein: Wants postponement to Wednesday's Fifa presidential election

Bernstein: Wants postponement to Wednesday's Fifa presidential election

FA chairman David Bernstein believes Sepp Blatter will not have a full mandate if Wednesday's Fifa presidential election goes ahead.

Amid corruption allegations surrounding world football's governing body, the FA has requested Fifa postpones the election in which Blatter is standing unopposed for re-election.

A 75 per cent majority support of the 208 member nations of Fifa would be required for any postponement and, while Bernstein admits this is unlikely, he would like to speak on the matter at the congress if possible.

He told Sky Sports News: "I think it is unlikely (to get the sufficient votes) to be honest, we're certainly not banking on that, but I think we'll do the right thing.

"If I'm allowed to stand and speak I will certainly do that but I don't know what the rules are for that.

"I don't think it is in Mr Blatter's own interests to go forward in that situation. I think he won't have a full mandate in my view, which is not what he should want, and not what Fifa should want."

David Bernstein

Quotes of the week

"My team are looking at that now - if we can, we will."

The FA board decided weeks ago to abstain from voting and on Tuesday asked for a postponement, as have the Scottish FA.

Not satisfactory

Bernstein added: "Given everything that is happening now with Fifa and clearly it isn't satisfactory, I mean there is an awful lot of smoke at the moment - maybe there's some fire or maybe there's not, maybe there's a conflagration under there - we don't know.

"But given that, to have a one candidate situation seems not to be in any way ideal, it seems to create a problem.

"I think in a way, if I can say, I don't think it is in Mr Blatter's own interests to go forward in that situation. I think he won't have a full mandate in my view, which is not what he should want, and not what Fifa should want."

He defended the FA's stance on the issue and believes it has got a lot of support, if not vocal at present.

"I suspect there is a lot of tacit support out there for this. I say tacit because for various reasons I think people are concerned obviously to keep things together, there may be other reasons as well why they want to support the situation but actually I think there is a lot of quiet support.

"Now the question is 'will that support become louder, more visible?' I believe there are some countries already that have agreed to support us. I know of one or two," he said, although he would not be drawn on which ones.

He added: "We have done something I think to take a lead in this and, as a matter of principle, I think there are very important principles involved here.

"The FA is often accused of not taking a lead in things and not being courageous or whatever, and I hope we are doing that in this case.

"We're not showboating, we're doing it for proper reasons in the interests of the wider game."