Alberto Contador reaches settlement with International Cycling Union over doping fine

Last Updated: 13/12/12 5:41pm

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Alberto Contador: Tested positive for clenbuterol at the 2010 Tour de France

Alberto Contador: Tested positive for clenbuterol at the 2010 Tour de France

Sky Bet

The International Cycling Union (UCI) has agreed a settlement with Alberto Contador over the Spaniard's positive doping test at the 2010 Tour de France.

Contador was banned for two years for testing positive for clenbuterol and the UCI had gone to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) in a bid to hand down a €2.4m fine.

However, the Cas revealed that the case had been settled amicably.

A UCI statement said: "The Cas has been informed of an amicable settlement between the UCI and A Contador regarding this issue and has officially terminated the arbitration."

Meanwhile, the UCI has instructed auditors to carry out a review of its governance in the wake of the Lance Armstrong scandal.

Cycling's world governing body and its leadership - president Pat McQuaid and honorary president Hein Verbruggen - has been heavily criticised for numerous perceived failings after the scale of doping at Armstrong's US Postal Service team was revealed by an United States Anti-doping Agency (Usada) investigation earlier this year.

The organisation had already asked an independent commission to look into its conduct, but has now also called in auditors KPMG in preparation for a consultation exercise entitled "A Bright Future for Cycling", which will take place early 2013.

A separate UCI statement read: "The UCI has also engaged the international auditors KPMG to carry out a review of the governance of the UCI, as well as that of the Cycling Anti-Doping Foundation, reporting back in time for its findings to be debated in the consultation process."

Anti-doping is one of four topics to be discussed at next year's consultation, with globalisation, riders and the sports calendar three other topics. Governance issues will be considered in all four areas.

The consultation will be separate from the independent commission, which was tasked with reviewing all the issues contained in Usada's report on Armstrong and the US Postal Service squad.

McQuaid said: "We must all work together to recover from the damage which the Armstrong affair has undoubtedly done to our sport, the sport we all love and cherish.

"The world is moving forward and cycling has to keep up. As all cycling enthusiasts know, when the peloton moves forward you either keep up or get left behind."

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