Dave Brailsford was staggered by the USADA report into Lance Armstrong

Last Updated: 13/10/12 11:11am

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British Cycling performance director and Team Sky boss Dave Brailsford admits he was staggered by the extent of the systemic doping revealed in the report by the United States Anti-Doping Agency into Lance Armstrong's former US Postal Service Pro Cycling Team.

According to USADA, Armstrong led "the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen".

Eleven of Armstrong's former team-mates testified against him, including Michael Barry, who rode at Team Sky under Brailsford despite their zero tolerance policy.

Brailsford said: "It is shocking, it's jaw dropping and it is very unpleasant, it's not very palatable and anybody who says it is would be lying wouldn't they?

"You can see how the sport got lost in itself and got more and more extreme because it seemed to be systematic and everybody seemed to be doing it at the time - it completely and utterly lost its way and I think it lost its moral compass.

"Everybody has recalibrated and several teams like ourselves are hell-bent on doing it the right way and doing it clean.

"The challenge is that it is understandable now for people to look at any results in cycling and question that."

Brailsford admitted to being disappointed by Canadian Barry, who was on the USPS team between 2002 and 2006.

He said: "We signed Michael from HTC which was at the time highly regarded as being a very sound, clean team and during his time at Team Sky we have had absolutely no cause for concern whatsoever, there has never been any question in terms of his performances, his training, his behaviour on the team - there have never been any issues in that respect.

"But ultimately he lied and we set out with a zero tolerance policy so we said that anyone who has had a doping conviction from the past or proved to have been involved on doping hasn't got a place on Team Sky - that is our policy.

"When you take someone you ask them a question and if someone lies to you and you find out later it's disappointing."

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