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Dominic Cork discusses Windies' batsmen's woes after nine-wicket defeat to Australia in first ODI at the WACA

Sammy (left) was not smiling for long at the WACA, as his side were knocked over for 70

Dominic Cork described West Indies' batting display as "atrocious" after they were dismissed for 70 en route to losing the first ODI of their five-match series in Australia.

The tourists were bowled out inside 24 overs, with skipper Darren Sammy (16), Kieron Powell and Darren Bravo (both 11) the only men to make double figures in Perth - the extras column top scored with 17 - as the Caribbean troop posted their third-lowest ODI total in history.

WINDIES' LOWEST ODI SCORES

54 v South Africa - Cape Town (Jan 25, 2004)
61 v Bangladesh - Chittagong (Oct 18, 2011)
70 v Australia - Perth (Feb 1, 2013)
80 v Sri Lanka - Mumbai (Oct 14, 2006)
87 v Australia - Sydney (Dec 8, 1992)

And former England seamer Cork slammed the Windies' batsmen's shot selection and says severe discussions must be held if Sammy's charges are to avoid further disappointment in game two, also at the WACA, on Sunday.

"West Indies were atrocious and there needs to be some serious words spoken in that dressing room amongst the batsmen," Cork told Sky Sports HD.

"We can question whether Sammy's decision to bat first was the right one, but they played some very poor shots and capitulated too easily.

"These are professional, experienced, international batsmen who have played at Perth before and knew what was coming at them; the ball swung a bit but they didn't adapt to conditions quick enough and need to take a look at themselves.

"It was very humiliating for West Indies' players and supporters - and you would expect the team to struggle again on Sunday."

Problem

Chris Gayle was far from his usual bludgeoning self at the WACA, hitting one boundary from 12 deliveries before placing the ball into the hands of Aaron Finch off the bowling of Clint McKay, who finished with figures of 3-10 from his seven overs.

The Jamaican also found garnering runs whilst playing in the 2012/13 Big Bash for Sydney Thunder difficult, averaging 19.57 from his seven innings with a highest score of 65, and Cork pinpointed a potential reason for the burly left-hander's slump.

"Gayle used to stand outside his stumps, but now he is covering his stumps to stop being bowled, negate the swing and to ensure that when the opposition bowl into him he is able to work the ball through the leg side," said Cork, who featured in 32 ODIs for England, taking 41 wickets.

"The problem with that is that if a ball starts to go away from him, he is unsure where the stumps are and thinks: 'This might be on off stump', when actually it is outside; he is getting out to good balls but not ones you haven't seen before.

"International teams and T20 teams have worked him out a bit - sometimes they start off at him with off-spin - but with all the analysis that goes on around the world that will happen.

"He has a weakness outside off-stump and needs to work on it - but he is a match-winner and an entertainer and you can't disregard him; West Indies have no-one else to fill his spot."

Rhythm

Glenn Maxwell was the star of Australia's very brief batting show, cracking 51 off 35 deliveries after being propelled to the top of the order, as the hosts reached their modest target of 71 in 9.2 overs.

"Starc looks in rhythm at the moment. He is bowling in exceptionally good areas and swinging the ball late at a decent pace."

Ian Harvey

But erstwhile Baggy Green all-rounder Ian Harvey, who watched the action unfold in the Sky Sports studio along with Cork, was quick to praise the bowling of New South Wales seamer Mitchell Starc, who tore the Windies to shreds with career-best figures of 5-20.

"Starc seems to know his game and looks in rhythm at the moment," said Harvey. "He is bowling in exceptionally good areas and swinging the ball late at a decent pace and his performance at the WACA was up there with his best.

"He has a big series against India coming up and has to be fit and selected for the Ashes, but he has all the attributes to bowl well in England, as he is tall and generates good bounce. He is part of a good stock of fast-bowlers that Australia have at the moment."

On Starc's fellow paceman James Faulkner, who returned figures of 2/14 on his debut, weeks after helping Melbourne Stars reach the Big Bash semi-finals, Cork added: "He is not a big swinger of the ball and is still understanding his action and what his stock ball is, but I have been impressed by him since the Big Bash.

"I like the way he attacks the opposition, I like the way he is in their face and aggressive, I like the fact he is confident but not over-confident and I like the fact he can bat, too. He, along with (seamer) Ben Cutting and Maxwell, should be part of the future of Australian cricket."