Download our podcast with David Haye, Amir Khan, Carl Froch and Anthony Ogogo on life outside the ring

Last Updated: 23/01/13 4:38pm

  • Share:

This week Sky Sports brought you a unique show, as British boxing's biggest names revealed what life is like outside the ring.

David Haye, Amir Khan, Carl Froch, Anthony Ogogo and host Johnny Nelson opened up their hearts in Britain's Best: The Gloves Are Off .

They didn't discuss their latest performances or their next fight. Instead, Britain's Best was talking about their early years, their families, their fame, their lives away from boxing and the issues they have had to take on.

Haye, Khan, Froch, Ogogo and Nelson dropped their defences and opened up. It was personal and powerful, amazing and amusing but above all, a fascinating insight into the men we usually see in the ring.

But don't worry if you missed the show. You can catch up now with our one-off podcast.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE PODCAST

(If the podcast doesn't open in a new window, then right click on the above link and save the file to your machine)

SKY SPORTS SUBSCRIBERS CAN ALSO WATCH THE SHOW AGAIN VIA SKY GO

Here's a sample of what you will get...

David Haye

"You've got your family life, your private life, then you have your on-screen, in-ring persona. I've always said from day one that they are very separate. Private life is private, boxing life: talk to me about whatever you want, film me wherever I'm going. But behind closed doors that's for you, that's not for them. I've stuck by that and I'm very happy that I've done that. I don't get much intrusion into that. There's enough pressures in life, without getting your family involved too much."


Amir Khan

"Mum never came to a fight. She is always in a room praying the whole day, in the room on the prayer mate. No-one knows this. She even fasts on that day. She even says to me she's not bothered about me winning or losing the fight 'I just don't want you to get hurt'. The last time she saw me fight, it seemed like I was very hurt. My sisters and my fiancée do the same things; they fast and pray. My fiancée said she was praying for me so much she had headaches. My mum is a super woman; without her I don't think I'd have got this far."


Carl Froch

"I went to a different B&Q the other day and it was a mistake. In the B&Q I usually go in for my building materials they all know me. I get a little nod, a little wave, I'm sweet. I went to the other one near the riverside and it's like 'Carl Froch is in here!' Then it's like they're on me and I can't go anywhere! When I go abroad, to a different part of the world such as America, I'm getting acknowledged and recognised and it's very nice. It's brilliant. It's slowly happened for me."


Anthony Ogogo

"My mum is without a doubt the most influential person in my life today. She was really ill, she had a brain aneurism six weeks before the Olympic games. She was at death's door for a long period of time; she was in a coma for a month. Six weeks prior to the Olympic games my sister rang me up and told me what happened. I can't really remember but it was the worst day of my life. I rushed home, I pulled out of the Olympic Games, I turned up at the hospital and my mum was wired up to all these machines and stuff. I couldn't believe it. The day before all this I left to go to Sheffield, she was fine. I'm a bit of a mummy's boy, she handed me my packed lunch for the journey and everything was normal. Then, 24 hours later... the worst day of my life."

Johnny Nelson

"In 1990, I boxed Carlos De Leon - and stunk the place out! There were 11 million viewers on TV, I was 22-years-old and it was my big chance. Everybody I'd ever seen in my life was in the crowd; Linda Lusardi, the cast from EastEnders, they were all in the crowd... and I absolutely froze. At 22! After that I couldn't walk down my own streets in Sheffield. I had to get work abroad. It was how the public were towards me that moulded me into the man I am today."

CLICK HERE TO HEAR THE FULL SHOW ON THE PODCAST

WATCH AGAIN VIA SKY GO

  • Share: