NFL: Salary cap for next season increased by almost $10m to $133m

Last Updated: 01/03/14 9:42am

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The National Football League's salary cap is to be increased by nearly $10m next year, a larger rise than expected.

The decision means teams will have a total of $133m to use on salaries, with the cap based on projected revenues from all of the NFL's commercial agreements for the upcoming season.

It also meets requirements under the Players' Association's Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA).

The 2014 level represents the highest salary cap set by the league, and this is expected to rise next year when new television contracts are factored into the equation.

A current CBA agreement allows players 55% of revenue from TV deals, 45% of money from league properties and 40% of local revenue.

Pittsburgh Steelers ($138.7m) and Dallas Cowboys ($150.9m) are the only two teams projected to be above the salary cap and the increased limit for the 2014 season will allow them greater opportunity to hold onto players.

Teams have until March 11 to cut or trade away players on their roster or renegotiate contracts to ensure they meet the cap requirements.

Teams above the cap are fined by the league.

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